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Leena Bakes: Cranberry Gingerbread Sorbet Sandwiches!

By on Nov 23, 2011 in Cookies, Desserts, Leena Bakes, Leena Cooks, Recipes, Sorbet | 0 comments

Rumor has it Turkey day is just around the corner, so I thought this would be the perfect time to roll out my new favorite winter dessert recipe: cranberry gingerbread sorbet sandwiches. Technically, I made these for my pre-Turkey day chili cookoff, which you’ll read about soon. But since cranberries only seem to appear in the market from November-December, this is a really great way to enjoy the short but delicious cranberry season. The recipe and more food porn after the jump! The idea for this recipe came from my original cranberry sorbet recipe, which I have rocked out for the past three years or so. This isn’t your typical cranberry sorbet. It’s got a bit of tartness, yes, but enough sugar to balance out the flavors. There is a hint of orange and ginger, not so much that you can pick it out in this recipe, but just enough to make the cranberries taste fragrant,...

Amuse bouche: More vegetarians against Thanksgiving

By on Nov 25, 2010 in amuse bouche, Food history, Holidays, Thanksgiving | 0 comments

The group People For the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) are against Thanksgiving, and have used the holiday to spread their belief of anti-cruelty to animals. One campaign encouraged Americans to “Give turkeys something to be thankful for!” In response to the Butterball Thanksgiving talk line, PETA had members call the hotline and share with Butterball employees that there is no proper way to kill and cook a turkey. Source: Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America p.543

Amuse bouche: Historical Vegetarians against Thanksgiving

By on Nov 25, 2010 in amuse bouche, Food history, Holidays, Thanksgiving | 0 comments

Vegetarians have protested the holiday of Thanksgiving and it’s ritual of eating turkey for many years, but perhaps the oldest known vegetarian against Thanksgiving was John Harvey Kellogg from the late 19th-early twentieth century. The same man who ran a sanatarium, invented corn flakes and other cereals, and popularized the use of peanut butter as a health food was very against Thanksgiving. In 1894, his wife, Ella Kellogg, wrote and published an entirely vegetarian Thanksgiving meal, which included a “mock turkey” shaped like a real turkey. Source: Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America p.543 ************************ Amuse Bouche: Noun. Etymology: French: literally, entertains the mouth. A small, complimentary appetizer served at the beginning of a meal to awaken the taste buds. Leena Eats definition: a quick shot of gastronomic knowledge for the brain....

Amuse bouche: What ingredients are traditional for Thanksgiving?

By on Nov 23, 2010 in amuse bouche, Food history, Holidays, Thanksgiving | 0 comments

Turkey with a bread stuffing and cranberries. White potatoes were introduced in the 18th century, sweet potatoes at the end of the 19th century. Despite the fact that pumpkins are native to America, the first pumpkin pie recipe was published in a British cookbook. Source: Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America pp.542-543 ******************************* Amuse Bouche: Noun. Etymology: French: literally, entertains the mouth. A small, complimentary appetizer served at the beginning of a meal to awaken the taste buds. Leena Eats definition: a quick shot of gastronomic knowledge for the brain. ~LTG!

Amuse Bouche: How did Thanksgiving become a national holiday?

By on Nov 23, 2010 in amuse bouche, Food history, Holidays, Thanksgiving | 0 comments

Thanksgiving became a national holiday in the U.S. thanks largely in part to one woman: Sarah Josepha Hale. Hale is best known for writing popular poems, such as “Mary Had a Little Lamb”, and for being one of the first authors in the country to write about slavery. For 17 years, Hale wrote to presidents, Congress, and other government members asking for the last Thursday in November to be declared a national holiday. Hale believed that in a time of great turmoil for the country, with slavery, war and economic hardships, a national holiday such as Thanksgiving would bring the country together. In 1863, President Lincoln finally announced the national holiday, and every president since has done the same. Source: Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America, pp.540-541 *************************************** Amuse Bouche: Noun. Etymology: French: literally, entertains the...