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Procrastination at its Finest: Dark Chocolate Cupcakes with Wattle seed Icing

By on Jul 3, 2008 in Cupcakes, Leena Bakes | 19 comments

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Procrastination at its Finest: Dark Chocolate Cupcakes with Wattle seed Icing
Just another “I should have been writing my paper, but instead I baked” mistakes: dark chocolate cupcake with wattle seed icing.

Anyone got a spare two thousand words? The old dissertation is looking a bit skinny at the moment, and after six straight months working on one paper, I have to be honest–I have nothing left to say. I’m spent. Over it. Done. And yet it is still here, demanding words from me that I don’t have like a nagging housewife. I am married to my freaking dissertation…and I think it is time to start seeing other papers. Thankfully, I like to channel my frustration into baking. I was so in love with Chockylit from Cupcake Bakeshop’s dark chocolate cupcakes with salted caramel icing from a few weeks ago, I wanted to try and make my own variation. The cupcake recipe itself was perfect, and yields a moist, rich chocolate cake that I believe comes from the use of good chocolate with cocoa powder, instead of the traditional cocoa powder only recipes.

Procrastination at its Finest: Dark Chocolate Cupcakes with Wattle seed Icing
The wattle seed in action.

In the original recipe, the salted caramel icing is actually a cream cheese frosting, but with just a small amount of cream cheese so it can support the salted caramel without overpowering it. I had some wattle seed leftover that I wanted to use before I left the country, and I wanted a neutral frosting base to put it in so the wattle seed would be the main flavor. You may remember wattle seed from a previous post, where I used it in a tiramisu. Wattle seed is a native Australian ingredient that tastes a lot like coffee, chocolate and hazelnut. It usually comes ground and roasted, and almost looks like instant coffee powder. So I took the original salted caramel icing recipe, and substituted re-hydrated wattle seed for the salted caramel. I placed two tablespoons of wattle seed in some warm water for ten minutes, and then strained. You end up with something that looks like coffee grounds, but you can eat them (and they taste a bit better, especially mixed in with other ingredients). I mixed the wattle seed into the cream cheese frosting, and it was sooooooooooooooo good. Like, this should be dangerous good. And considering my jeans are only getting tighter with each new procrastination baking session, it is dangerous. One cannot finish writing a massive paper if their jeans are strangling their body.

Procrastination at its Finest: Dark Chocolate Cupcakes with Wattle seed Icing
Have one more, Leena. You don’t need to breathe!

I loved how the wattle seed gave the frosting a speckled appearance, almost like cookies and cream ice cream. I sprinkled a bit of wattle seed on top, you know, to make it all fancy and such. The frosting tasted great, and the cream cheese was barely noticeable, it just sort of lightened up the heavy wattle seed flavor. If you like coffee and chocolate, this is great frosting to try. Chockylit is a big fan of filling her cupcakes with more frosting, and lets be honest, who doesn’t want more sugary goodness inside their cupcakes? She likes to cut off the top of the cupcake at an angle so it makes a cone, then chops off the cone and fills the space in the bottom of the cupcake with more frosting. I attempted to do this, but wasn’t that successful. I didn’t get the frosting down far enough so you could notice it, it just sort of blended in with the top frosting layer. It worked in one out of 6 cupcakes, and I did love the one that worked (it reminded me of those Hostess cupcakes with the frosting in the middle and the squiggly white line on top), so I will have to try this again.

Procrastination at its Finest: Dark Chocolate Cupcakes with Wattle seed Icing
I’m a failure, but I still taste great!

Back to the paper…or maybe some banana bread. ~LTG!

Procrastination at its Finest: Dark Chocolate Cupcakes with Wattle seed Icing

19 Comments

  1. amanda

    21 Apr ’08

    Post a Reply

    okay, so i just know i saw your tiramisu last year but some how i totally missed out on the wattleseeds! damn it! so wattleseeds taste similar to coffee? intriguing… i have to say, i’ve never heard of a wattle seed before, but apparently i reallly enjoy saying wattle seed… wattleseed! so you are moving back to the states in 3 weeks?!? i must get your address so i can finally send you a little package! good luck on the dissertation!

  2. amanda

    21 Apr ’08

    Post a Reply

    okay, so i just know i saw your tiramisu last year but some how i totally missed out on the wattleseeds! damn it! so wattleseeds taste similar to coffee? intriguing… i have to say, i’ve never heard of a wattle seed before, but apparently i reallly enjoy saying wattle seed… wattleseed! so you are moving back to the states in 3 weeks?!? i must get your address so i can finally send you a little package! good luck on the dissertation!

  3. Amanda~Yup, wattle seeds taste like a combo of coffee, chocolate and hazelnuts. It is rare that you would eat wattle seed straight up with a spoon, although I did have it smeared across some chocolate ice cream, sort of like a dry sauce. It rocks. A lot. And yes, so much fun to say the name. Sort of like chinchilla. Who doesn’t like to say that?

    Two weeks and counting until my U.S. arrival! Thanks for the well wishes on the paper. I have at least 30 posts to write after I’m done with the paper, so it never stops.

  4. Amanda~Yup, wattle seeds taste like a combo of coffee, chocolate and hazelnuts. It is rare that you would eat wattle seed straight up with a spoon, although I did have it smeared across some chocolate ice cream, sort of like a dry sauce. It rocks. A lot. And yes, so much fun to say the name. Sort of like chinchilla. Who doesn’t like to say that?

    Two weeks and counting until my U.S. arrival! Thanks for the well wishes on the paper. I have at least 30 posts to write after I’m done with the paper, so it never stops.

  5. Jess

    22 Apr ’08

    Post a Reply

    good luck with the ongoing procrastination battle, look forward to more posts when you’re done!

  6. Jess

    22 Apr ’08

    Post a Reply

    good luck with the ongoing procrastination battle, look forward to more posts when you’re done!

  7. What a excellent use for Wattle seed. They look brilliant. Good luck with the paper. My X did his Masters paper for years and that thing drove us mental.

  8. What a excellent use for Wattle seed. They look brilliant. Good luck with the paper. My X did his Masters paper for years and that thing drove us mental.

  9. leenatrivedi23

    23 Apr ’08

    Post a Reply

    Jess~ Thank you! I cannot wait to unload those 30 posts or so…

    Amelita~ Thanks, the frosting was the perfect way to use wattle seed, in my humble opinion. It really helped highlight the flavor.

    My paper makes me hate words. And books. And you know, life. I cannot wait until it is over!

  10. leenatrivedi23

    23 Apr ’08

    Post a Reply

    Jess~ Thank you! I cannot wait to unload those 30 posts or so…

    Amelita~ Thanks, the frosting was the perfect way to use wattle seed, in my humble opinion. It really helped highlight the flavor.

    My paper makes me hate words. And books. And you know, life. I cannot wait until it is over!

  11. barred owl

    26 Apr ’08

    Post a Reply

    Hi!

    I was so happy when I was watching Top Chef the other night and Mark, the Aussie, used wattle seed in a dessert and I knew what it was because of reading your blog!

    so, thanks!

  12. barred owl

    26 Apr ’08

    Post a Reply

    Hi!

    I was so happy when I was watching Top Chef the other night and Mark, the Aussie, used wattle seed in a dessert and I knew what it was because of reading your blog!

    so, thanks!

  13. leenatrivedi23

    30 Apr ’08

    Post a Reply

    Barred Owl~ Aw, thanks! Wattle seeds really do kick major ass, so it is understandable the Top Chef guy used it. Although, he is a Kiwi (meaning from New Zealand), not an Australian. Which is funny, because if I didn’t live down here, I wouldn’t know the difference. But man, them Aussies, just don’t call them a Kiwi or vice versa. It would be like mistaking a Chicago Cubs fan for a Chicago Bears fan…you will probably get smacked a few times. Thanks for writing!

  14. leenatrivedi23

    30 Apr ’08

    Post a Reply

    Barred Owl~ Aw, thanks! Wattle seeds really do kick major ass, so it is understandable the Top Chef guy used it. Although, he is a Kiwi (meaning from New Zealand), not an Australian. Which is funny, because if I didn’t live down here, I wouldn’t know the difference. But man, them Aussies, just don’t call them a Kiwi or vice versa. It would be like mistaking a Chicago Cubs fan for a Chicago Bears fan…you will probably get smacked a few times. Thanks for writing!

  15. Anna

    30 Apr ’08

    Post a Reply

    How annoying that you have a word number target for your write-up! Seems like you should just be able to say what you have to say without pulling randomness out of your butt just to fill up the pages. Not that I am a stranger to the pulling out of the butt business. I’m a pro, in fact.

    I still have to try the salted caramel cupcakes you made. I love salted sweets and I love caramel. I can’t wait till I have the time to do it! So, when are you coming to visit me in Boston? ;) Have a safe trip home!

  16. Anna

    30 Apr ’08

    Post a Reply

    How annoying that you have a word number target for your write-up! Seems like you should just be able to say what you have to say without pulling randomness out of your butt just to fill up the pages. Not that I am a stranger to the pulling out of the butt business. I’m a pro, in fact.

    I still have to try the salted caramel cupcakes you made. I love salted sweets and I love caramel. I can’t wait till I have the time to do it! So, when are you coming to visit me in Boston? ;) Have a safe trip home!

  17. viccherikoff

    12 Apr ’10

    Post a Reply

    I am so pleased that you like my little discovery. Wattleseed was an accidental creation when I over-roasted some seeds I was preparing for nutritional analysis in a project on Australian Aboriginal wild foods (see http://www.cherikoff.net/cherikoff/index.php?id… for the background). We now supply ice cream companies (Vosges Chocolates make Wattleseed ice cream for their retail outlets), bakeries, sauce companies and more with our artfully roasted Wattleseed.

    Incidentally, you soaked them in hot water. I put a tablespoonful or two into a jar, add twice the volume of water and nuke this while watching it doesn't over-boil. Once the liquid bubbles up the jar it's ready to use or store in the frig. You've just made a Wattleseed extract and use the liquid only for sauces or custard, scoop some of the grounds for texture and visuals (as you did) or add a mixture of both for ice creams and whipped cream, pancakes and waffles. If I bake Wattleseed bread, I just use the dry grounds as the proofing and baking help release the flavor.

    I am still discovering new uses for Wattleseed and the extract we now make commercially. Put a splash of the extract into soy sauce and it elevates it to a fantastic condiment. Add the boiled grounds and extract to tahini for another taste sensation. By my all time favorite is still a simple Wattleseed cream. Here's how I use it in my Wattleseed pavlova (a rolled meringue dessert that's really simple to make). http://www.cherikoff.net/cherikoff/index.php?id=83

  18. viccherikoff

    12 Apr ’10

    Post a Reply

    I am so pleased that you like my little discovery. Wattleseed was an accidental creation when I over-roasted some seeds I was preparing for nutritional analysis in a project on Australian Aboriginal wild foods (see http://www.cherikoff.net/cherikoff/index.php?id… for the background). We now supply ice cream companies (Vosges Chocolates make Wattleseed ice cream for their retail outlets), bakeries, sauce companies and more with our artfully roasted Wattleseed.

    Incidentally, you soaked them in hot water. I put a tablespoonful or two into a jar, add twice the volume of water and nuke this while watching it doesn't over-boil. Once the liquid bubbles up the jar it's ready to use or store in the frig. You've just made a Wattleseed extract and use the liquid only for sauces or custard, scoop some of the grounds for texture and visuals (as you did) or add a mixture of both for ice creams and whipped cream, pancakes and waffles. If I bake Wattleseed bread, I just use the dry grounds as the proofing and baking help release the flavor.

    I am still discovering new uses for Wattleseed and the extract we now make commercially. Put a splash of the extract into soy sauce and it elevates it to a fantastic condiment. Add the boiled grounds and extract to tahini for another taste sensation. By my all time favorite is still a simple Wattleseed cream. Here's how I use it in my Wattleseed pavlova (a rolled meringue dessert that's really simple to make). http://www.cherikoff.net/cherikoff/index.php?id=83

  19. Can you elaborate on your tip about how to make your cupcake moist? whats the real secret? i have been struggling on that one, its sort of a hit and miss thing for me.

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